AYRES ON SEX AND SOCIETY


Sex among humans is very different than it is among other species, although tree-dwelling species (anthropoid apes and monkey share some of the differences. Jared Diamond started his book with his idea of a dog’s view of human sexuality:

If your dog had a brain, and could speak . .  .

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THINKING ABOUT SIMPLE THINGS

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– By Robert U. Ayres

Background

From early childhood I have been fascinated by learning “how things work”. I suppose that is quite natural for children, but for one reason or another, most children are discouraged at an early age. The world is too complicated, there are too many “things” to learn about, there are conflicting short-term needs for time, they are told that parents or teachers or priests will explain it all in due course when we are “ready”, etc.

For some reason, however, I found a book called “The Strange Story of the Quantum” that introduced a curious idea, namely that there is an underlying simplicity that can be grasped by human intelligence, and that understanding “things” can sometimes be approached from “below”, so to speak rather than from the usual perspective “above”.  I read that a fizzy-haired man named Albert Einstein had already found a way to put that underling simplicity in a single mathematical equation, a “theory of everything”. It is why I was attracted to physics.

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Editorial: Hmm, let’s see. Now that didn’t work, didn’t it? That at least is clear. But why? And what do we do now?

Editor’s Note. Paris, 25 May 2018.

Dear readers, friends and colleagues,

This ambitious collaborative web project “Ayres on Environment, Economy, Energy & Growth” has been in existence for close to four full years now.  And over this time despite the potential of tremendous content and burning issues, and considerable effort on our part, it has failed to take off.  At least to the degree that the subject merits.  What went wrong?  And where should we go from here?

Making a web platform like this work — highly technical content, including a fair dose of abstract  topics and analytic approaches which require a well prepared audience to be meaningful — is no easy task. And all the more so in this era of crushing information overload.  But that would be a poor excuse.

The main shortcoming thus far has been that we have simply failed to give it sufficient time, commitment, touch and content  — or regularity, — to win over the kind and size of audience which the work and findings of Ayres and his distinguished colleagues deserve in their own work in these complex inter-related spheres of, once again, Environment, Economy, Energy & Growth,..

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Op-Ed: Econ Majors Graduate With a Huge Knowledge Gap

What’s needed is a mandatory course on ethics and the limits of knowledge.

    Moral philosopher. 1723-1790

  – By Noah Smith.   Bloomberg View.   https://bloom.bg/2vue79V

Economics remains one of the most popular majors for college students. Most econ students, of course, don’t go on to become professional economists; instead, they fill the ranks of the U.S.’s vast pper-middle-class of business managers and professionals.

The models they learn in their college classes inform the way they think about the world, even if they don’t end up using them for quantitative purposes after final exams are over.

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After the great repatriation: Where will the money go and what will it do?

– By Robert U. Ayres

               For several weeks, the guys and gals at CNBC and Bloomberg News, and their guests, have been talking about the coming tax reform (cut) legislation that the Republicans finally seem to have in their grasp. Well, maybe not exactly reform, maybe not revenue-neutral, but at least tax cuts for the corporations that give them campaign money. All the cheerleaders, both in Congress and the White House, assert confidently that faster growth will pay for the cost of the tax cut, even though virtually all economists (including me) say that it won’t.

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